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AN AFTERNOON WITH GEORGE LOIS

Within the Greenwich Village apartment he has called home for decades, George Lois sat down with Industry co-founder Oved Valadez to discuss the inspiration and ideology behind his life’s work as a creative advertising pioneer and social justice advocate. A dry irreverent wit characterized George’s stories, beginning with his earliest years as a Greek immigrant in the Bronx. He credited these roots for providing him the hustle, grit, and determination that empowered his career. George directed Esquire magazine covers from 1962 to 1972, creating a legacy of socially fueled imagery as he portrayed the faces and icons of American culture. Known for breaking a few rules in the pursuit of arresting national attention, George continued to hone his craft as a visual communicator through campaigns that portrayed the injustices of the Vietnam War, Muhammad Ali’s refusal of the draft, and the wrongful imprisonment of boxer Rubin “Hurricane” Carter. On his approach to creating messages that matter, George puts it simply:

“Fall in love with this advertising. Great advertising in and of itself becomes a benefit of the product. You’re making the advertising part of the excitement, of the taste of the product.”

Technology and Creativity

ON TECHNOLOGY AND CREATIVITY

Regarding the state of creative culture today, George pointed to technology and bureaucracy as contributors to an age of stagnant and repetitive ideas. In George’s words “Group grope… analysis paralysis” and “the marketing assholes that are around you” are the creators of a sea of meaningless content. Despite the constant evolution of technology, the creation of authentic and impactful messages will remain imperative. “I call myself a cultural provocateur, I want that on my gravestone.”

Technology and Creativity

MUHAMMAD ALI

Andy Warhol

ANDY WARHOL

Sonny Liston

SONNY LISTON

Hurricane

RUBIN “HURRICANE” CARTER

Lt. Calley

LIEUTENANT CALLEY

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Special thanks to George Lois and Good Karma Creative, Black Bright